Alison Cooper

Eastern ARC Officer, University of East Anglia (maternity cover)

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Alison Cooper

Eastern ARC Officer, University of East Anglia (maternity cover)

Alison Cooper is Executive Officer at UEA in the Research and Enterprise Department. She is also Eastern Arc Officer and acts as the first point of contact for UEA students and academics for Eastern Arc queries.

Laura Forder

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of East Anglia

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Laura Forder

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of East Anglia

Laura will work under the supervision of Drs Rose Meleady and Simon Watts, UEA, and Dr Tim Hopthrow at the University of Kent. Her research will investigate the cognitive consequences of negative and positive conflict.

Prof Sara Connolly

Quantative Social Sciences, University of East Anglia

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Prof Sara Connolly

Quantative Social Sciences, University of East Anglia

Sara is a Professor in Personnel Economics in Norwich Business School at the University of East Anglia. She is Co-I of the ESRC Work Learning and Wellbeing Evidence Programme, a collaboration with the Universities of Essex and Sheffield and leads the ‘Influencing policy’ theme for the ESRC Impact Accelerator Award at UEA. Her other main research interests are in careers, employment, gender and work-life balance, current projects include: Fatherhood in the 21st Century, the European Commission: Facing the Future; and What are excellent scientific careers?

Scott Fenn

PhD student, Digital Humanities, University of Essex

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Scott Fenn

PhD student, Digital Humanities, University of Essex

Scott specialises in 20th Century conflict. His current research analyses the wartime relationship between Nazi Germany and her south eastern allies, Slovakia, Romania, Hungary and Bulgaria, focusing on the complex interplay between Nazi ideology and wartime practicalities. Other research interests include: The First and Second World War, Alliance and Transnational History 1933-45, the German experience 1914-45, tactical and strategic history, combat experienced 1914-45 and public/outreach programs in modern history.

Dr Karen Smyth

Senior Lecturer, School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, University of East Anglia

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Dr Karen Smyth

Senior Lecturer, School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, University of East Anglia

HOW CAN THE STUDY OF DUSTY MANUSCRIPTS LEAD TO THE CREATION OF INTERACTIVE DIGITAL MAPPING TOOLS? HOW DOES DIGITISING GLOBALLY SIGNIFICANT MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN LETTERS LEAD TO DONNING WALKING GEAR AND CREATING HERITAGE TRAILS ACROSS NORFOLK? These are the questions Dr Karen Smyth's research and impact work seeks to answer. As one of several in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing’s faculty, Dr Smyth is widening access to, and inviting creative interpretations of, the region’s medieval and early modern archival collections. As a consequence, the international significance of hidden treasures in Norfolk's archives are being given new life.

Georges Poquillon

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Essex

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Georges Poquillon

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Essex

Georges is interested in applied economics, migrations and urban economics. The first chapter of his thesis focuses on the impact of media on the economic assimilation of immigrants in London. Specifically, he is studying whether the number of negative articles about immigration affect immigrants’ performances on the labour market and their trust in others. He collected the data on news articles by designing his own web-crawling programme, and used the individual level data of the Understanding Society survey.

Prof Heather Laurie

Prof Heather Laurie, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) University of Essex

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Prof Heather Laurie

Prof Heather Laurie, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) University of Essex

Professor Heather Laurie is responsible for developing the University of eEsex’s research strategy (including the dissemination and application of the University’s research through knowledge transfer activities, and consultancy), and for ensuring the effective implementation of the strategy. She also represents the University nationally and internationally in relation to research issues, raising the profile and reputation of the University and influencing national and international policies and agendas in this area. She spends 20 per cent of her time undertaking research at the highest level and maintaining and developing her research career.

Christine Stedtnitz

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Essex

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Christine Stedtnitz

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Essex

Christine's research is in the fields of public opinion, political decision-making, and political psychology. Her dissertation focuses on political information processing, in particular how people assess factually incorrect information that confirms pre-existing beliefs and factually correct information that disconfirms political beliefs. She uses quantitative, survey, and experimental research methods and holds a BA and an MA in political science from the University of Konstanz and has studied abroad at Queen’s University in Canada and at Sciences Po Paris.

Ishpur Bhandal

PhD student, Digital Humanities, University of Essex

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Ishpur Bhandal

PhD student, Digital Humanities, University of Essex

Ishpur's research focuses on the use of digitised medieval manuscripts, seeking out an answer to whether they are beneficial in their digitised format to historians, and what effect the digital copy has on the role original manuscripts play in conducting research. Manuscripts are a cornerstone for information from the medieval period and their interpretation is crucial for reaching an understanding of the past, and with the effort put into digitising them, she hopes to answer whether they can be useful tools for historians.

Virginia Ghiara

Doctoral Student

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Virginia Ghiara

Doctoral Student

Virginia’s PhD research is on the role of big data for causal discovery in the social sciences. Her research involves the study of the specific problems that social scientists have to face when they deal with big data and the investigation of the most promising methods for analysing big data within this field. She works at the intersection of Philosophy, Digital Humanities and Social Science.

Nigel Perrin

Doctoral Student

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Nigel Perrin

Doctoral Student

Digital Humanities University of Kent

Mahmoud Abdelhamid

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of East Anglia

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Mahmoud Abdelhamid

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of East Anglia

Mahmoud’s PhD research is on the synthesis of novel biological nanostructures. His research involves studying how the structure of DNA can be manipulated using biologically relevant cations and ligands, and the synthesis of small DNA-based architectures. This approach has applications in drug delivery, epigenetic regulation and the development of genetic diseases.

Paul Gorny

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of East Anglia

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Paul Gorny

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of East Anglia

Paul’s PhD is entitled Inequality and conflict: The effects of immigrant and gender identities. The concept of identity spans many dimensions as no one can only be grouped into a single category. While there is evidence to believe that those dimensions that are most salient to us are likely to create group cohesion or conflicting behaviour with others, little has been said on how all the remaining dimensions can be used for conflict resolution. I will research this aspect using controlled experiments to contribute to the literature on economic conflict theory.

Alex Turton

PhD Student, Digital Humanities, University of East Anglia

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Alex Turton

PhD Student, Digital Humanities, University of East Anglia

Alex's research is about designing and creating a new digital methodology for analysing the comics form, specifically graphic memoirs. He works at the intersection of Digital Humanities, Cognitive Humanities and Semiotics with a particular focus on database design, concordance and hypertext theory.

Prof Neil Ward

Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic), University of East Anglia

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Prof Neil Ward

Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic), University of East Anglia

Professor Neil Ward is Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic) for UEA and is responsible for developing the strategic vision for all educational and student-related activity at the University. Working in close partnership with colleagues from UEA’s four faculties and with the Union of UEA Students, Professor Neil Ward shapes the University's educational priorities and leads policy development that further enhances UEA's outstanding student experience.

Elizabeth Stewart

PhD Student, Digital Humanities, University of East Anglia

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Elizabeth Stewart

PhD Student, Digital Humanities, University of East Anglia

Elizabeth’s research explores the creation and analysis of virtual representations of past landscapes. This work combines the disciplines of history, archaeology, heritage, and computer science, using CAD and GIS softwares. Elizabeth is particularly interested in using technology within archaeological, museum and heritage environments. She currently helps with the management of archaeological collections for the Norfolk Museums Service and with various archaeological organisations, including Young Archaeologists’ Club, Caistor Roman Project, and Sedgeford Historical and Archaeological Research Project.

Martina Billmeier

PhD student, Synthetic Biology, University of East Anglia

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Martina Billmeier

PhD student, Synthetic Biology, University of East Anglia

Martina’s PhD research is entitled “Sequence and structural requirements for Y RNA cleavage” Small non-coding RNAs play important roles in gene expression regulation. Initially attention was focused on the 21-24-nucleotide small RNAs such as microRNAs but next generation sequencing has revealed a slightly longer class of small RNAs that are 30-34 nucleotides long. These longer small RNAs are often generated from known non-coding RNAs such as tRNA or snoRNA. The biogenesis of these longer small RNAs seems to be diverse and is not well understood. We have characterized such longer small RNAs generated from Y RNAs in mammalian cells and found that it is different from microRNA biogenesis but also from the way tRNA derived small RNAs are produced. Results from a high-throughput mutagenesis approach suggest that the secondary structure of the Y RNA, rather than its sequence, determines where the cleavage happens that liberates the small RNAs from the 3' end of Y RNAs. This project aims to validate these results and also to apply a high-throughput mutagenesis screen on the 5' region of the Y RNA to study the production of small RNAs from that end of the molecule. Combining the results for Y RNA derived longer small RNA generation from both 5' and 3' end of these molecules will enable us to establish how this class of small RNAs are produced by designing specific novel mutants and testing them in mammalian cells.

Megan Straw

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of Essex

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Megan Straw

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of Essex

Megan's PhD involves researching into transforming Streptomyces lividans into a possible industrial cell factory for the heterologous production of high value proteins and enzymes. This involves specifically rewiring the copper supply pathway in S. lividans to transport copper to target enzymes. Once these target enzymes become metallated, these proteins can then be used to enhance fermentation properties of the host. This work is greatly aided by collaborators working in the Microbial Biotechnology group at Leiden University, The Netherlands. They were able to illustrate the function of copper in initiating a development switch in S. lividans. This research is multidisciplinary with techniques used from several areas including protein engineering, microbial genetics and molecular biology. Overall, these techniques will be used in order to produce, characterise and test a selection of synthetic components that will be assembled in S.lividans for the study of fermentation properties and heterologous expression of target enzymes.

Benjamin Gregson

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of Essex

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Benjamin Gregson

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of Essex

The pathways involved in oil degradation by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria (HCB) are not fully understood and require investigation. The overall aim of Ben's project is to use synthetic biology to engineer oil degradation pathways of HCB, to explore and develop new biological devices for enhanced bioremediation. A long term goal of this study would be the development of a genetically modified microorganism (GMM) capable of degrading both n-alkanes and polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), eliminating competition between HCB, making biodegradation more efficient.

Naziyat Khan

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of Kent

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Naziyat Khan

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of Kent

Working under the direction of Professor Martin Warren, Naziyat's research will focus on enhancing nutrition in plants through plant/microbe interactions.

Charmaine Keatley

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Kent

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Charmaine Keatley

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Kent

Working under the supervision of of Dr Heejung Chung and Professor Sarah Vickerstaff, Charmaine's research will investigate to what degree men's involvement in home life is related to women's participation and progress in the workplace.

Vanessa Dias

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Kent

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Vanessa Dias

PhD Student, Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Kent

Vanessa will work under the supervision of Dr Hannah Swift. Her research will investigate the social psychological and organisational consequences of ageism.

Sarah Blackburn

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of Kent

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Sarah Blackburn

PhD Student, Synthetic Biology, University of Kent

Working under the supervision of Dr Gary Robinson, Sarah's research will will focus on outer membrane vesicle synthesis in microorganisms.

Professor Paul Allain

Dean Graduate Studies, University of Kent

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Professor Paul Allain

Dean Graduate Studies, University of Kent

Paul Allain is Professor of Theatre and Performance at the University of Kent where he has been since 2000. He has published several books, DVDs and articles on theatre and actor training as both author and editor, with a particular focus on contemporary Polish theatre and interest in digital publications. Paul has a long history with Eastern ARC, having been the Academic Lead for Digital Humanities from 2014 - 2016. In January 2017, Paul took up post as Dean of Kent's Graduate School.

Prof Fiona Lettice

Pro Vice Chancellor (Research & Innovation), University of East Anglia

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Prof Fiona Lettice

Pro Vice Chancellor (Research & Innovation), University of East Anglia

Fiona's areas of research interest and expertise are: innovation management and new product development - including disruptive, green, open, social and responsible innovation; diversity management; buyer-supplier relationships; social media and branding. These have been across sectors, but some sectors such as automotive, law and Higher Education have featured more strongly in her research.

Prof Philippe De Wilde

Pro Vice Chancellor (Research and Innovation), University of Kent

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Prof Philippe De Wilde

Pro Vice Chancellor (Research and Innovation), University of Kent

Prof. Philippe De Wilde is Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Vice-President) Research & Innovation at the University of Kent, Canterbury, UK, and with centres in Brussels, Paris, Rome and Athens. Between 2007 and 2014 he was Head (Dean) of the School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, with campuses in Edinburgh, Dubai and Malaysia. Prof. De Wilde obtained the PhD degree in mathematical physics and the MSc degree in computer science in 1985 from Ghent University, Belgium. He was Lecturer and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Imperial College London, between 1989 and 2005. Laureate, Royal Academy of Sciences, Letters and Fine Arts of Belgium, 1988. Research Fellow, British Telecom, 1994. Vloeberghs Chair, Free University Brussels, 2010. He has published 50 journal papers and 52 conference papers. He has published four books, including ``Neural Network Models’’, Springer, 1997, and ``Convergence and Knowledge-processing in Multi-agent Systems’’, Springer, 2009. He works in computational intelligence and cybernetics. He started contributing to multi-layer feedforward neural networks in 1987. This area is now called deep learning and is an essential technology used by Google and Facebook. His work with British Telecom from 1994 to1999 has contributed to scalable mobile apps, ensuring current mobile networks can cope with the massive data transfers to and from apps. Prof. De Wilde is a Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, and a Senior Member of IEEE. He has started a twinning scheme between research groups at the University of Kent and groups elsewhere in the EU. He has an active interest in Science 2.0 and the networking of researchers.

Prof Aletta Norval

Pro Vice Chancellor (Education), University of Essex

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Prof Aletta Norval

Pro Vice Chancellor (Education), University of Essex

Professor Aletta Norval is a member of the University of Essex’s executive leadership team and plays a central role in the development and implementation of the University’s Strategic Plan. She is responsible for developing the University’s education strategy (covering both undergraduate and postgraduate education, and both the academic and extra-curricular experience of students), and for ensuring the effective implementation of this strategy. She also represents the University nationally and internationally in relation to education issues, raising the profile and reputation of the University and influencing national and international policies and agendas in this area.

Dr Chidiebere Ogbonnaya

Eastern ARC Fellow in Quantitative Social Sciences, University of East Anglia

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Dr Chidiebere Ogbonnaya

Eastern ARC Fellow in Quantitative Social Sciences, University of East Anglia

Dr Ogbonnaya holds a B.Sc. in Human Anatomy (University of Port Harcourt), a Baccalaureate in Human Resource Administration (Cambridge International College), an M.Sc. in Occupational Health and Safety Leadership (University of Nottingham), and a Ph.D. in Management Research (University of East Anglia). His doctoral thesis examined the impacts of high-performance work practices on employee attitudes and well-being using large data from the 2004 British Workplace Employment Relations Survey (WERS) and the 2010 British National Health Service (NHS) Staff Survey. His thesis offers links between human resource management, organisational behaviour and public services management.

Dr Ben Miller

Eastern ARC Fellow in Synthetic Biology, University of East Anglia

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Dr Ben Miller

Eastern ARC Fellow in Synthetic Biology, University of East Anglia

Ben Miller is the Eastern ARC Fellow in Synthetic Biology at the University of East Anglia. Ben is a molecular biologist with an interest in calcium signalling pathways and synthetic biology in plants. His research is focussed on how plants use calcium as a second messenger to respond and adapt to the environment.

Dr Paul Gooding

Digital Humanities, University of East Anglia

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Dr Paul Gooding

Digital Humanities, University of East Anglia

Dr. Gooding’s research explores the impact of large-scale digitisation in the cultural heritage sector, including issues of access to digital heritage materials, and shifting conceptions of textuality and meaning in the digital age. He has previously worked as a broadcast media librarian, and as a project officer for the Digital Preservation Coalition. He serves as Reviews Editor for ‘Digital Scholarship in the Humanities’, the official journal of the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations.

Dr Chieh Hsu

Synthetic Biology, University of Kent

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Dr Chieh Hsu

Synthetic Biology, University of Kent

Dr Hsu joined Kent in March 2015. His main research interest is in quantitative understanding of the molecular organisation of membranes which regulates the intracellular membrane trafficking. After contributing to the early findings in mechanisms of exosome biogenesis during his PhD curriculum, he broadened his research scope and studied the hysteresis and stochastic/deterministic behaviours of the transcriptional feedback systems in his postdoctoral research. He now leads a research group in the School of Biosciences at the University of Kent. Dr Hsu aims to bridge the two disciplines, molecular systems biology and cell biology, using synthetic approaches. His group is currently working on establishing a synthetic model system in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae,as a tool to investigate how molecular feedback loops lead to domain structures on the membrane, in particular, those formed with small GTPases, the key proteins determining the membrane identity for transport.

Dr Hannah Swift

Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Kent

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Dr Hannah Swift

Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Kent

Dr Swift was previously a research associate working with Prof Dominic Abrams in Psychology, using the Attitudes to Age module in the European Social Survey (ESS) to investigate, compare and contrast people's attitudes to younger and older people across the European region. Her research interests are in ageism, attitudes toward age and the consequences of age stereotypes.

Dr Benjamin Vis

Digital Humanities, University of Kent

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Dr Benjamin Vis

Digital Humanities, University of Kent

Working from the University of Kent, I start and facilitate collaborative research initiatives in the broad fields of Digital Humanities and Digital Heritage within the new research consortium Eastern ARC, uniting the universities of Kent, Essex and East Anglia. My work is primarily interdisciplinary covering both the humanities and social sciences. I am currently also a Visiting Researcher at the School of Geography, University of Leeds, where I completed my PhD in 2013, titled Mapping the Inhabited Urban Built Environment: The socio-spatial significance of the material presence of boundaries through time (http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/5900/). This work develops a new analytical and interpretive method for urban researchers in archaeology, history, geography, architecture and cognate disciplines, called Boundary Line Type (BLT) Mapping. I received my undergrad and research Master’s degrees from Leiden University reading Archaeology with a specific focus on Mesoamerican and Maya culture. My research interests centre on (material and social) space, urban space and the built environment in particular. I aim to broadly contribute to fundamental understandings of how human beings in societies transform their life-world for and through inhabitation. To this end I focus on interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives and methodological developments, which draw upon research in archaeology, geography, anthropology, architecture, history, sociology, and related fields. In its applied form I am developing case studies on a variety of cities to enable social comparisons of urban built environment traditions or cultures worldwide and across time. So far this work has started to address the historical development of Winchester from the Medieval period and the Early Classic Maya Lowland city Chunchucmil (Mexico). A particular new direction in my research is concerned with gaining a better understanding of the functioning of tropical low-density cities or agro-urban landscapes as found in Mesoamerica, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Southeast Asia. By contrasting these alternative forms of urbanism to urbanisation patterns and processes in contemporary cities I aim to learn about the social resilience and sustainability of developing physical configurations for urban ways of life. I hold memberships of the following academic societies: Royal Geographical Society (Urban Geography and Historical Geography groups); Wayeb (European Mayanists); International Seminar on Urban Form (ISUF); Aerial Archaeology Research Group (AARG); International Society for Archaeological Prospection (ISAP); Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA); European Association for Archaeologists (EAA).

Dr Boyd McKew

Synthetic Biology, University of Essex (School of Biological Sciences)

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Dr Boyd McKew

Synthetic Biology, University of Essex (School of Biological Sciences)

Dr McKew has been a member of The Environmental and Plant Bioscience Research Group since 2007. He is a marine biologist and environmental molecular microbiologist whose research interests include pollution microbiology (e.g. microbial biodegradation of crude oil and hydrocarbons), the structure and functioning of microbial communities, carbon & nitrogen cycling in marine and estuarine environments and algal and bacterial physiology. In his current research as an Eastern ARC Research Fellow in Synthetic Biology he is investigating the marine Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacteria, who are important microorganisms responsible for the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in marine oil spills. As well as increasing our understanding of the physiology and ecology of these specialist bacteria, the research aims are to design and construct new biological devices and systems for the enhanced bioremediation of marine oil pollution.

Dr Amanda Wilkinson

Digital Humanities, University of Essex (Department of History)

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Dr Amanda Wilkinson

Digital Humanities, University of Essex (Department of History)

Dr Wilkinson was the Economic History Society Power Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research, 2013-2014, and was a Research Officer on the Integrated Census Microdata Project. Her research interests include changing patterns in the occupational enumeration in the censuses of England and Wales: 1851-1911, database analysis, prostitution and trafficking in Victorian London, and nineteenth century gender roles and female occupations.

Dr Federica Genovese

Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Essex (Department of Government)

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Dr Federica Genovese

Quantitative Social Sciences, University of Essex (Department of Government)

Dr Genovese is a Fellow in the Department of Government at Essex. Her interests are in international relations, transnational organizations, and comparative analysis. Currently her research areas are international environmental policymaking and the politics of financial crises

Kath Mortimer

Eastern Arc Officer, University of East Anglia (currently on maternity leave)

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Kath Mortimer

Eastern Arc Officer, University of East Anglia (currently on maternity leave)

Kath Mortimer is Executive Officer at UEA in the Research and Enterprise Department. She is also Eastern Arc Officer and acts as the first point of contact for UEA students and academics for Eastern Arc queries.

Sarah Tetley

Eastern Arc Officer, University of Kent

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Sarah Tetley

Eastern Arc Officer, University of Kent

Sarah Tetley is Eastern ARC Officer at University of Kent.

Prof Mark Smales

Synthetic Biology, University of Kent

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Prof Mark Smales

Synthetic Biology, University of Kent

Prof Smales is currently Professor of Mammalian Cell Biotechnology. He heads a group that has a number of on-going projects whose objectives are to further advance our understanding of biotechnological products and processes at the fundamental biological or chemical level to enable their manipulation and control for improved biotherapeutic recombinant protein yields. He is Director of the Centre for Molecular Processing and a member of the Industrial Biotechnology and Synthetic Biology Research Group.

Prof Christine Raines

Synthetic Biology, University of Essex (School of Biological Sciences)

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Prof Christine Raines

Synthetic Biology, University of Essex (School of Biological Sciences)

Professor Raines is Head of the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Essex. Her main research interest is in primary carbon metabolism, and investigating the relative importance of individual enzymes in the Calvin cycle in controlling the rate of carbon fixation and plant growth. Christine is also interested in the regulation of chloroplast metabolism and currently has projects exploring the role of the redox regulated protein, CP12, and on the relationship between the Calvin-Benson Cycle and thiamine biosynthesis. Christine's laboratory uses a wide range of techniques to address these questions including transgenic plants and synthetic biology based approaches.

Prof Tamas Dalmay

Synthetic Biology, University of East Anglia (School of Biological Sciences)

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Prof Tamas Dalmay

Synthetic Biology, University of East Anglia (School of Biological Sciences)

Tamas Dalmay graduated from the University of Budapest and obtained his PhD in molecular virology in Hungary. He moved to the UK with an EMBO fellowship in 1995 to work on the genetics of gene silencing. He is a group leader at the University of East Anglia, Norwich since 2002 where he has been working on microRNAs (miRNAs) and other non-coding short RNAs in plants and animals. He has been the Head of the School of Biological Sciences since January 2014.